The Official Upper Rissington Parish Council Website Cheltenham
Upper Rissington Parish Council website
The Parish Council is made up of volunteers who live in the village, who give up some of their free time to help make the village a better place.
The Official Upper Rissington Parish Council Website Cheltenham
Upper Rissington Parish Council website
The street names give a clue to the village's former life, having names such as Sopwith Road and Avro Road.
The Official Upper Rissington Parish Council Website Cheltenham
Upper Rissington Parish Council website
The village is the most populous area of the 'Rissingtons' electoral ward.
The Official Upper Rissington Parish Council Website Cheltenham
Upper Rissington Parish Council website
There is also a village green, children's play area community hall, hairdressers and gym.
The Official Upper Rissington Parish Council Website Cheltenham
Upper Rissington Parish Council website
This ward starts in the south at Great Rissington and stretches north to Icomb.
The Official Upper Rissington Parish Council Website Cheltenham
Upper Rissington Parish Council website
The total population for Great Rissington taken at the 2011 census was 2,103.
The Official Upper Rissington Parish Council Website Cheltenham
Upper Rissington Parish Council website
Our official population from the 2011 census was quoted at 1,046.
The Official Upper Rissington Parish Council Website Cheltenham
Upper Rissington Parish Council website
Attractions such as the Cotswold Wild Life Park near Burford and Bourton-on-the-Water are all within easy reach by car.
The Official Upper Rissington Parish Council Website Cheltenham
Upper Rissington Parish Council website
Much of Upper Rissington is a conservation area and the village lies within the Cotswolds Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB)

Potential Telecommunications Disruption

The grass contractor has unfortunately snagged an exposed telecommunications cable today on the main field. BT has been       informed and a visit is scheduled. It is not certain whether any        residents will be affected, but apologies to anyone who is.

National Meadows Day

Putting the Cotswolds meadows back on the map – National Meadows Day

Saturday 1 July 2017  #NationalMeadowsDay

 * Save the date: National Meadows Day to take place on 1 July 2017

* Wildflower meadows are vanishing; 97% have been lost since the 1930s

* A single healthy meadow can be home to over 80 species of wild flowers

National Meadows Day (1), dedicated to celebrating and protecting our vanishing wildflower meadows and the wealth of wildlife they support, will take place on Saturday 1 July 2017. This year’s National Meadows Day will be the biggest yet, with over 100 events (2)       taking place across England, Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales.

From barefoot walks and scything workshops, to picnics and bug hunts, people will have the opportunity to experience first-hand the petalled-paradise that is a meadow in summer.

Hucclecote Meadows on the outskirts of Gloucester was rescued from development and remains an oasis of wildflowers and insect life. To celebrate National Meadows Day, the Cotswolds                        Conservation Board and Gloucester City Council  have organised a medicinal herb walk from with Max Drake from the Urban Fringe Dispensary, natural sculpture making sessions with artist Alan May, as well as wildflower and butterfly ID sessions and pond dipping! All are welcome – come and find out why meadows matter, from 1pm to 4pm.

For a full programme of events taking place in the Cotswolds visit; www.magnificentmeadows.org.uk.

National Meadows Day is the headline event of Save Our                Magnificent Meadows (3), the UK’s largest partnership project transforming the fortunes of our vanishing wildflower meadows, grasslands and wildlife. Plantlife, supported by money raised by        National Lottery players with a grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) (4), is spearheading the project.

Claire Parton, Save Our Magnificent Meadows Project Manager, said:

“Meadows, once a feature of every parish in the Cotswolds, are now an       increasingly fragile part of our national heritage but all is not lost.                National Meadows Day is the perfect way to explore and enjoy the        flowers and wildlife of the Cotswolds magnificent meadows and              understand their special place in our shared social and cultural history”.

“Beyond being a quintessential sight of summer, meadows’ value to our wildlife cannot be overstated – a single healthy meadow can be home to over 80 species of wild flowers, such as cuckoo flower, yellow rattle,         orchids, knapweed and scabious, compared to most modern agricultural pasture which typically  supports under a dozen species.”

Eleanor Reast, Conservation Officer for Save Our Magnificent         Meadows in the Cotswolds, said:

“Just 100 years ago there would have been a meadow in every Cotswold parish, supporting a way of life that had gone on for centuries. They       provided grazing and hay for livestock, employment, and food and medicine for the parish and were part of a community’s cultural and           social history. Today, just 3% of the meadows that existed in the 1930’s remain (5) – that’s a loss of 7.5 million acres of wild flower grassland”.

ENDS

Media contact:
Chris Brant
Communications Officer

Tel: 01451 862003
Email: chris.brant@cotswoldsaonb.org.uk

The Official Parish Council website for the People of Upper Rissington